Kickoff events planned for World breastfeeding week


Nashville

On Saturday, August 4 at 10:00am, Nashville area moms will join moms from 11 countries participating in The Big Latch On, a global breastfeeding initiative that allows communities to show support to moms.

All nursing mothers and moms-to-be are invited to Hadley Park Recreation Center from 10:00am-11:30am to enjoy wellness information, refreshments, and peer support.

The Big Latch On, the main event, will take place at 10:30am. This free community event is sponsored by the Nashville Breastfeeding Coalition, NashVitality, Metro Public Health Department and Julie’s Village.

The Big Latch On is scheduled during World Breastfeeding Week, August 1-7. Governor Haslam recently signed a proclamation officially recognizing World Breastfeeding Week in Tennessee.

“The Nashville Breastfeeding Coalition accepts projects that make a direct impact to the community. We feel lucky to be supporting breastfeeding mothers and helping to educate moms-to-be at this event. We can’t wait to be with our Nashville area moms and babies!” – Julie Hamilton, President of Nashville Breastfeeding Coalition and CEO of Julie’s Village.

Knoxville

Marcie Singleton Award Recognizes Efforts on Behalf of Breastfeeding Mothers and Their Babies

 To kick off World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1-7), the East Tennessee Breastfeeding Coalition (ETBC) is hosting an “Ages and Stages” themed celebration at New Harvest Park, 4775 New Harvest Lane, on Aug. 1 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. At 12:30, ETBC will be presenting the Marcie Singleton Award in recognition to a business or organization that best provided for the needs of breastfeeding mothers and their babies. Knox County Public Library is this year’s recipient. The event is free and open to the public. Breastfeeding mothers and moms-to-be are encouraged to attend.

 “We are very honored to be recognized as an employer who values breast-feeding,” said Myretta Black, Knox County Public Library director. “Giving children a healthy start through proper nutrition can set a tone for life. Research is clear that breast-feeding babies is one of the most important foundations to good health.” 

 Marcie Singleton was the Nutrition Director and Breastfeeding Coordinator for the Knox County Health Department’s Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). She was a tireless advocate for mothers’ and babies’ rights to breastfeed. Her work included consultation with businesses to build lactation programs using the Business Case for Breastfeeding, a comprehensive program designed to educate employers about the value of supporting breastfeeding employees in the workplace. Last year’s award recipient was the Knoxville office of Lattimore, Black, Morgan & Cain (LBMC), a firm that provides accounting, human resources, technology, staffing and investment advisory services.  In 2010, ETBC recognized East Tennessee Children’s Hospital and EdFinancial. 

 As part of the “Ages and Stages” theme, participants will be able to visit booths with information and activities related to the baby’s age and stage in life, starting with newborn and going all the way to two years old, which is the World Health Organization’s recommendation for breastfeeding. Here is a list of booth sponsors:

 0-3 months ¾ Fluff and Stuff, baby wearing items and ideas
3-6 months
¾ Knox County Health Department’s WIC program and Dietitian Sarah Griswold, back to work
6-9 months
¾ Lisa Ross Breastfeeding Center, mama craft making nursing necklaces
9-12 months
¾ Amy Dever, UT Nutrition Department, healthy finger foods for the breastfeeding baby
12 months and beyond
¾ Holistic Moms Network, baby led weaning

 Not only do breastfed babies and their mothers receive numerous benefits from their time breastfeeding, but employers and society as a whole profit from the relationship.  Breastfed babies have fewer ear infections, lower respiratory infections, and less diarrhea, as well as a reduced risk for asthma, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Mothers who breastfeed have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, ovarian cancer and postpartum depression.  Employers benefit because parents of breastfed babies miss less work time caring for their sick child. They also save the medical costs from dependents on the company health care plan.

 Societal benefits of breastfeeding include the prevention of 1,000 infant deaths annually and the savings of approximately $13 billion per year nationally. Medical care costs are lower for fully breastfed infants than those infants who were never breastfed. Breastfed infants typically need fewer sick care visits, prescriptions, and hospitalizations. Breastfeeding also is environmentally friendly. It requires no formula production, packaging, or shipping. 

 The components of time and place are both regulated by state and federal law.  Tenn. Code Ann. § 50-1-305 (1999) requires employers to provide daily unpaid break time for a mother to express breast milk for her infant child. Employers also are required to make a reasonable effort to provide a private location, other than a toilet stall, in close proximity to the workplace for this activity. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 also addresses an employer’s responsibilities toward breastfeeding mothers. Employers are required to provide “reasonable break time for an employee to express breast milk for her nursing child for one year after the child’s birth each time such employee has need to express the milk.” Employers are also required to provide “a place, other than a bathroom, that is shielded from view and free from intrusion from coworkers and the public, which may be used by an employee to express breast milk.”

 

John Myers Band to Perform Hot Summer Nights Concert at Blount County Public Library


MARYVILLE, TN  (July 23, 2012)   John Myers has been engulfed in the rhythm and blues tradition since starting his career with his brothers and three others as The Five Pennies.  Later, as The Four Pennies, they began playing some of John’s original pieces which they recorded with Brunswick Records.

            John’s rich voice represented Motown but is certainly more flexible than just soul. 

The current band is a blend of multiple traditions and, in addition to John Myers, includes Sean McCollough on keyboards, banjo and guitar; Chris Durman on guitar; Steve White on mandolin; Maria Williams on upright bass and Steve Corrigan on drums.

The John Myers Band will perform a concert on Thursday, August 9, at 7 p.m. as a part of this season’s Hot Summer Nights Concert series at the Blount County Public Library.  The concert series is sponsored by the Blount County Friends of the Library.

John’s professional career started when he, his twin brother and a younger brother formed a group, The Five Pennies, with Benny Washington, Charles Holloway and Clifford Curry.  On Savoy records, they released several songs including “Mr. Moon” by Clifford Curry.

When they changed their name to The Four Pennies, they recorded three of John’s songs on Brunswick Records, “ ‘Tis the Season,” “You Have No Time to Lose” and “You’re Gas with Your Trash.”

In 1970, they changed their name to Hearts of Stone and recorded on the Motown label an album, “Stop the World, We Wanna Get On.”  The band members were John, Floyd Lawson, Carl Cutler and Lindsey Griffen, and they wrote songs for a CD which was released in 2002/2004. 

John currently collaborates with his wife, Pamela, a prolific songwriter.  They released a live album from WDVX Blue Plate Special radio show and another album in May.

For the library concert, the band will perform a mix of songs, traditions and styles, many blended with an Americana touch.

Other Hot Summer Nights concerts, all on consecutive Thursday evenings and concluding September 13, are indoors in the air-conditioned library facility.

 

Gritte Fritter (John Dupree), singer-guitarist, will perform on August 16 with Abigail Sinders on fiddle and vocals and Roscoe Morgan on electric bass and vocals.  They will perform folk and Americana song selections ranging from the traditional (When The Work’s All Done This Fal)l, to popular (Still Crazy After all These Years), and the classic (Gentle On My Mind).  Dupree moved to Tennessee from North Carolina in 2001.

 

The Standards/Spencer’s Own, performing on August 23, sing a cappella with a smoothly blended harmony that only five brothers can achieve. The quintet of Morgan, Nathan, Jordan, Nicholas and Quinn Williams, present a high-energy program of choreography, comedy and audience interaction.  While this group hails from Nashville and is currently changing their name to Spencer’s Own to honor their father, they have performed previously at several schools in Blount County.

 

Fritz Beer, solo singer/songwriter, will perform on August 30.  Fritz Beer writes and sings down-to-earth, spirited, song stories about good-hearted people who sometimes go astray.  His music touches on multiple American traditions of rock, country, soul and blues.  He has won songwriting awards and recently received an ASCAP songwriting award for publishing achievements. He has composed songs for short films, two feature films and multiple televisions shows, including four current shows.  

 

Knoxville Opera Company, on September 6, will preview the coming season’s operas, Die Fledermaus, The Girl of the Golden West and Cinderella.  Executive Director, Brian Salesky, will accompany one or two of the performers from this season’s productions as they sing excerpts from the three operas.

 

Bill Robinson String Quartet, on September 13, will perform a string concert of music ranging from classical to Celtic, tangos to Turtles.  The quartet, all teachers, includes Bill Robinson, violin; Allyson Finck, violin; Christy Graffeo, viola; Sarah Cline, cello.  With the varied selections of music, there should be something to suit everyone’s taste, and these teachers especially invite students to the concert.

            At most of the Hot Summer Nights concerts, CDs by the performers will be available for sale.

Free and open to the public, these concerts will be at the Blount County Public Library, located at 508 N. Cusick Street, Maryville.

               For further information about library programs or services, call the library at 982-0981 or visit the Web site atwww.blountlibrary.org .

OBAMA VISITA FLORIDA Y VIRGINIA PARA HABLAR DE LA SEGURIDAD ECONOMÍCA DE LA CLASE MEDIA


CHICAGO- El jueves, 2 de agosto, el Presidente Obama viajara a Orlando, FL y Leesburg, VA para hablar sobre la decisión que los votantes enfrentarán en esta elección entre dos visiones fundamentalmente distintas de como hacer que nuestra economía crezca, generar empleo para la clase media y pagar el déficit.

El presidente cree que la única manera de construir una economía duradera es desde la clase media hacia afuera, no de arriba para abajo. Él hablará de su plan para restaurar la seguridad económica al pagar nuestro déficit de una forma responsable que asegure que todos paguen lo que les corresponde y también invierta en cosas que necesitamos para generar empleos y hacer que nuestra economía crezca a largo plazo, como la educación, la energía, la innovación y la infraestructura. 
El presidente también hará otro llamado al Congreso a actuar inmediatamente para darles a las familias de la clase media seguridad al evitar un aumento programado para 98 porciento de los estadounidenses, incluyendo familias a lo largo de la Florida. El Presidente Obama ya ha reducido los impuestos de una familia típica de la Florida por $3,400 en los últimos cuatro años y $4,000 para una familia típica en Virginia en los últimos cuatro años, ayudando a las familias a enviar a sus hijos a la universidad, a comprar su primera casa y a pagar su cuidado médico y el cuidado de sus hijos.

Conozca cuán grande es su riesgo de ser diabético


 

Examen de Riesgo de la Diabetes
¿Podría usted tener diabetes y no saberlo?
Existen 25.8 millones de niños y adultos en los Estados Unidos con diabetes — ¡y casi un tercio de ellos (o 7 millones de personas) no lo saben! Tome este examen para saber si usted está en riesgo para tener o desarrollar la diabetes tipo 2. La diabetes es más común en los afro-americanos, hispanos/latinos, nativo americanos, asiáticos americanos y los de las islas del pacífico. Si usted pertenece a uno de estos grupos étnicos, usted necesita prestar mucha atención a este examen.

Averiguelo ahora mismo. Aprete en prueba

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE FOR JOURNALISM STUDENTS


 OPEN TO ALL

NAHJ General Scholarships – Rubén Salazar Fund

Ranging from $1,000 – $2,000 per student, these scholarships are awarded to college-bound high school seniors, college undergraduates and graduate students pursuing careers in English or Spanish-language print, photo, broadcast or online journalism.

NAHJ Ford Motor Company Fund Scholarships

These Scholarships of up to $2,500 will be awarded to students pursuing careers in print, broadcast, online and visual journalism. College-bound high school seniors, college undergraduates and graduate students are eligible as long as they have a 2.0 average. These scholarships are made possible by the Ford Motor Company Fund, an effort to support young aspiring Latino journalists.

NAHJ PepsiCo Scholarships

These Scholarships of up to $2,500 will be awarded to students pursuing careers in print, broadcast, online and visual journalism. College-bound high school seniors, college undergraduates and graduate students are eligible as long as they have a 2.0 average. These scholarships are made possible by PepsiCo, an effort to support young aspiring Latino journalists.

OPEN EXCLUSIVELY TO BROADCAST STUDENTS

NAHJ Maria Elena Salinas Scholarships

Established in 2002, this program awards a scholarship of up to $5,000 to students who demonstrated a strong desire to pursue a career as  a Spanish-language broadcast journalist. This program is made possible through a donation from Univision network news anchor, and NAHJ founding member Maria Elena Salinas. Her generosity has been matched by the Univision network. which has also contributed to this award. This scholarship is awarded to college undergraduate and graduate students. Recipients of the Maria Elena Salinas Scholarship will also have an opportunity to intern with either the news division of the Univision network or with an Univision affiliate.

NAHJ Geraldo Rivera Scholarship

Up to $5,000 will be awarded to a college senior or graduate student pursuing a career in English or Spanish-language TV broadcast journalism. This scholarship is made possible thanks to a substantial donation by Geraldo Rivera, host of Geraldo At Large on FOX News, as a way to support young Latino journalists aspiring to enter the field.

NAHJ Soledad O’Brien Scholarships

Scholarships of up to $5,000 will be awarded to undergraduate or graduate students pursuing a career in TV broadcast journalism. This scholarship is made possible thanks to a donation from Soledad O’Brien, an anchor and special correspondent for CNN.

NAHJ Jane Velez-Mitchell Scholarships

Scholarships of up to $5,000 will be awarded to undergraduate or graduate students pursuing a career in TV broadcast journalism. This scholarship is made possible thanks to a donation from Jane Velez-Mitchell, a host for CNN/HLN.

Policia pide ayuda para resolver caso


Lunes, 23 de julio 2012
 
Durante la noche del lunes a las 10:50 pm la policía de Chattanooga respondió a un tiroteo que se produjo cerca de la cuadra 3700 de la 7 ª Avenida. La víctima, de 18 años, Courtney Birt, dijo a los oficiales que él estaba caminando a su casa cuando se le acercó un vehículo que transportaba (5) jóvenes negros. Después de una breve conversación, uno de los sospechosos le disparó en la pierna. Birt se escapó y fue trasladado a un hospital local donde recibió tratamiento por su lesión que no es de vida o muerte. La investigación sigue su curso.
 
Cualquier persona con información sobre este delito se le pide que llame al Departamento de Policía de Chattanooga al 423-698-2525.
Abogado de Inmigración

Los Hispanos tienen alta riesgo a la diabetes



La diabetes es un problema urgente de salud en la comunidad latina. Con tasas dos veces más altas que las de los no latinos, es importante ofrecer información a la comunidad latina sobre la gravedad de la enfermedad, sus factores de riesgo y las formas para controlar la diabetes, retrasarla o prevenirla, en el caso de aquellos que están en alto riesgo.Aprenda más sobre la Diabetes
La diabetes es un problema de salud urgente en la comunidad hispana/latina. Los números indican que la diabetes afecta desproporcionadamente a los latinos (casi el doble) comparado con los blancos no latinos

Teenagers shot a taxi driver


Monday, July 23, 2012

 

At 5:20 p.m. Chattanooga Police responded to a shots fired complaint at 2193 Dodson Avenue where they found a Mercury Cab driver who had been shot at but was not injured.  The driver stated that he had picked-up (4) juveniles in the 1700 block of N Hawthorne Street and dropped them off at 2193 Dodson Ave where they paid their fare and exited the cab.  Once outside the cab, one of the juveniles pointed a handgun at the cab driver and fired several rounds at him.  All of the juveniles fled the area on foot.  The juveniles were described as black males, approximately 15-17 years of age. 

 

Anyone with information on this crime is asked to call the Chattanooga Police Department at 423-698-2525.

Motorcycle deaths investigated


Monday, July 30, 2012

 

On Sunday, July 29, 2012 at 1130 PM, The Chattanooga Police Traffic Division responded to a multiple vehicle accident with a fatality at 7800 I-24. Witnesses stated that a motorcycle traveling eastbound on I-24 was attempting to pass a tractor trailer on the left side.  The motorcycle clipped the rear of another vehicle that was in the left lane while attempting the pass. This caused the motorcycle to crash and threw the rider of the motor cycle under a tractor trailer. The tractor trailer ran over the body of the motorcycle rider. A B/M age 24 , rider of the motorcycle, was pronounced dead by responding medics.  

 

No charges have been filed and the investigation of the accident is continuing.    

 

 

 

Fatality Crash/200 Hwy 153 NB

 

Monday, July 30, 2012

 

On Monday, July 30, 2012 at 1208 AM, The Chattanooga Police Traffic Division responded to a multiple vehicle accident with a fatality. Witnesses stated that a motorcycle traveling northbound on Hwy 153 was attempting to pass a tractor trailer.  The motorcycle clipped the tractor trailer on the left while attempting the pass. This caused the motorcycle to crash and left the driver lying in the left lane. The driver of another vehicle didn’t see the motorcycle rider lying in the roadway and ran over the body of the motorcycle rider. A W/M age 57, rider of the motorcycle, was pronounced dead by responding medics.  

 

No charges have been filed and the investigation of the accident is continuing.  

 

Fatality Crash Updates

 

Monday, July 30, 2012

 

The fatality victim of this morning’s crash on I-24 has been identified as 24 year-old, Brent Taylor and the fatality victim of this morning’s crash on Hwy 153 has been identified as 57 year-old, Terry Yates.  Yates retired from the Chattanooga Police Department in 2004 with over 25 years of service.  Both crash investigations are still on-going.

  

The Elvis Presley Blue Hawaii Tribute Show


Ronnie Miller as Elvis Presley

KNOXVILLE, TENN.—  Asia Café to commemorate the life of Elvis Presley on the eve of his untimely death.  The King of Rock ‘n Roll will be memorialized in an honorable manner by way of tribute singing, music, and entertainment.

Starring Knoxville’s Own-Ronnie Miller as Elvis Presley
AUG. 15TH 5–9PM

Reynolds kicks off 2012 Hot Summer Nights series at Blount County Public Library


MARYVILLE, Tenn—     Karen E. Reynolds, award-winning singer/songwriter, producer, publicist and promoter, will kick off the 11th annual Hot Summer Nights series on August 2 by performing selections (along with other music) from her new CD, “Read the Book.” 

This year’s concert series has a lineup of seven consecutive performances.  All programs will be on Thursday nights, starting at 7 p.m.  The concerts will be indoors, in the Reading Rotunda of the air-conditioned Blount County Public Library.

Reynolds and the back-up band, Sanctifried–with Kitt Rogers & Brandon Kottingen, will perform an interactive engagement with the audience, playing Americana music on acoustic instruments. 

Her sound and creativity are reminiscent of Mary Chapin-Carpenter, James Taylor and Carole King. 

As a performer, Reynolds has performed at some of the most prestigious music festivals in the eastern U.S. and has established herself as a peer with some of the best performers in the business.

She signed her first publishing contract in 2007 and now has a variety of publishing agreements, including writing with nationally-recognized artists, and three independently produced albums, plus the latest, “Read the Book.” 

In addition to independent labels and arrangements with a variety of Nashville publishing companies, Reynolds says she also “owns her own label; operates a booking/management agency for independent artists; has national credits to her name as producer, publicist or vocalist; teaches songwriting and music business for the University of Tennessee; is a Mentor/Instructor for the Country Music Hall of Fames prestigious ‘Words and Music in Schools’ program and is host/program director of Writer’s Block, a radio program that airs only independent artists.”   She also started a new type of concert series in Knoxville, Writer’s Block LIVE, as a spinoff of her radio program.

Awards, Accomplishments and Associations for Reynolds includes Winner of the Out and About Awards as the Favorite Musician and Winner of the Americana Highway HEMI Awards.  Her album, “Convince My Heart,” was nominated Best Folk Album at the Just Plain Folks Music Awards in Louisiana, and she was selected as Featured Artist for the “Cumberland Avenue Revisited: A History of Knoxville Music.”

Reynolds is a Board Member/Instructor at the ProMusicU.  She is a member of the  Nashville Songwriters Association International and a lifetime member of Indiegrrl. 

She serves as a mentor/writer at the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Words & Music In Schools Program.  She is a member of the Knoxville Arts & Culture Alliance and a performing member of the Nashville Independent Music Association as well as Just Plain Folks. For 17 years, she has been Anthem Vocalist for the Tennessee Smokies Club and Anthem Vocalist for the 1996 US Olympic Baseball Team and Immigration Naturalization Ceremonies in Knoxville, TN.

Some appearances and venues include Eddie’s Attic, Decatur GA; Blue Bird Cafe, Nashville TN; SOHo’s, Washington DC; Frank Brown International Songwriter’s Festival, Cape Fear Folk Fest, Wilmington, NC; Southern Womyn’s Festival, The Blue Plate Special, Bristol Rhythm & Roots, Underground Folk Series, Greenville SC; Knoxville Pride Festival; WDVX;  Camperfest, Haybarn Rendevous, Dixon IL; Women’s Week, Provincetown MA; The Moonlight, Birmingham AL; Charles & Myrtles, Chattanooga TN; Prodigal Son, Hyannis MA; Down Home, Johnson City TN; Malaprops, Asheville NC; The Mews, Provincetown MA; Segment of Society Concert Series, Indianapolis IN; Atlanta Pride, Atlanta GA; French Quarter, Nashville TN; Converse College, Spartanburg SC; BMI Acoustic Roundup, Nashville, TN; Flora Bama, Perdido Key FL; The Sutler, Nashville TN; Women’s Night OUT, Northampton MA; Nashville Songwriter’s Festival, Broken Spoke, Nashville TN; Millennium March, Washington DC; Oprah Winfrey’s Oxygen Network Nat’l Tour and Indiegrrl Nat’l Tour.

 

            Musical genres for other performers at this year’s Hot Summer Nights series will include Americana, Rhythm and Blues, Contemporary Country, Popular, Classical and even Opera.  All concerts will be at 7 p.m. on seven consecutive Thursday evenings, starting August 2 and concluding September 13.  All concerts are indoors in the air-conditioned library facility.

Those performers and dates of their performances will be:

 

The John Myers Band, appearing on August 9, features John Myers who has been engulfed in the rhythm and blues tradition since starting his career with his brothers and three others as The Five Pennies.  Then becoming The Four Pennies and playing some of John’s original pieces, they recorded with Brunswick Records. The current band is a blend of multiple traditions and includes Sean McCollough on keyboards, banjo and guitar; Chris Durman on guitar; Steve White on mandolin; Maria Williams on upright bass and Steve Corrigan on drums.

 

Gritte Fritter (John Dupree), singer-guitarist, will perform on August 16 with Abigail Sinders on fiddle and vocals and Roscoe Morgan on electric bass and vocals.  They will perform folk and Americana song selections ranging from the traditional (When The Work’s All Done This Fal)l, to popular (Still Crazy After all These Years), and the classic (Gentle On My Mind).  Dupree moved to Tennessee from North Carolina in 2001.

 

  The Standards/Spencer’s Own, performing on August 23, sing a cappella with a smoothly blended harmony that only five brothers can achieve. The quintet of Morgan, Nathan, Jordan, Nicholas and Quinn Williams, present a high-energy program of choreography, comedy and audience interaction.  While this group hails from Nashville and is currently changing their name to Spencer’s Own to honor their father, they have performed previously at several schools in Blount County.

 

 

  Fritz Beer, solo singer/songwriter, will perform on August 30.  Fritz Beer writes and sings down-to-earth, spirited, song stories about good-hearted people who sometimes go astray.  His music touches on multiple American traditions of rock, country, soul and blues.  He has won songwriting awards and recently received an ASCAP songwriting award for publishing achievements. He has composed songs for short films, two feature films and multiple televisions shows, including four current shows.  

           

  Knoxville Opera Company, on September 6, will preview the coming season’s operas, Die Fledermaus, The Girl of the Golden West and Cinderella.  Executive Director, Brian Salesky, will accompany one or two of the performers from this season’s productions as they sing excerpts from the three operas.

 

  Bill Robinson String Quartet, on September 13, will perform a string concert of music ranging from classical to Celtic, tangos to Turtles.  All teachers, the quartet includes Bill Robinson, violin; Allyson Finck, violin; Christy Graffeo, viola; Sarah Cline, cello.  With the varied selections of music, there should be something to suit everyone’s taste, and these teachers especially invite students to the concert.

 

At most of the Hot Summer Nights concerts, CDs by the performers will be available for sale.

Free and open to the public, these concerts will be at the Blount County Public Library, located at 508 N. Cusick Street, Maryville.

                For further information about library programs or services, call the library at 982-0981 or visit the Web site at www.blountlibrary.org 

ACLU-TN Launches Initiative to Ensure Immigrants Understand Constitutional Rights


NASHVILLE – In response to the Supreme Court’s recent decision on Arizona’s “show me your papers” law, the ACLU of Tennessee today launched an initiative to ensure that Tennessee’s immigrants understand their right to fair treatment in the justice system.
 
The centerpiece of this effort is the online “Immigrant Rights Resource Center,” with bilingual information on how to prepare for interactions with law enforcement.  ACLU-TN is publicizing the center with the distribution of posters in Spanish and English to social service agencies, businesses and churches across the state.
 
“The Constitution’s promise of fair treatment in the justice system applies to all people in this country, citizens and non-citizens alike,” said Hedy Weinberg, ACLU-TN Executive Director.  “ACLU-TN’s online Immigrant Resource Center is designed to help people understand the justice system and the safeguards it offers.”
 
The constitutional guarantee of due process ensures that people are treated equally within the justice system. The U.S. is not supposed to be a country that detains people, sometimes for years, without access to lawyers or family. Unfortunately, this is what is happening to thousands of immigrants caught up in raids, transferred into detention centers, and pressured into signing removal orders without being able to consult with counsel or family.
 
The printable documents in the resource center provide information on how the justice system works, as well as an understanding of constitutional protections. They include information on obtaining visas in cases of domestic and workplace abuse or human trafficking, encounters with law enforcement, the detention system, safety planning and raids.

Firefighters reaching for successful relationships with Hispanics


KNOXVILLE—  Firefighter Al Ludwig of the Knoxville, TN Fire Department created a program that will allow firefighters to communicate with Latino familias. Ludwig realized the Latino population in his community was growing, and he took the initiative to learn and teach his fellow firefighters some basic Spanish.

Tennessee Stage Company will be performing Shakespeare


MARYVILLE, TN (July 16, 2012 Once again, the professional actors with Knoxville’s Tennessee Stage Company will be performing a Shakespearean play at the Blount County Public Library.
Julius Caesar will be this year’s performance on Monday evening, July 30, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The production is sponsored by the Friends of the Blount County Public Library who will also serve as volunteers to help with parking and seating.
Although this year’s production has an almost entirely new cast, there are a couple of actors familiar to Blount County people. Joe Casterline, a Blount Countian, stars as Brutus. Another cast member, Steve Trigg, used to live in Blount County but now lives in Knoxville.
Tom Parkhill, Executive Director of the Tennessee Stage Company, says, “Because the play is required reading for many tenth graders, seeing a live performance can make a difference for students.  Watching actors portray scenes helps bring life to the words on the pages.” Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears” is just one of the many familiar quotations from Julius Caesar. Another provides an eloquent philosophy of death: “Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once.”

 And, of course, many betrayed souls mourn along with Caesar’s dying breath of “Et tu, Brute?”
Parkhill says that the Outreach mission for Tennessee Stage Company lets it take programs out to communities so that more people have the opportunity to see the show.
This is a drama appropriate for the entire family. It will be outdoors on the front lawn of the library, so be sure to bring along a blanket or lawn chairs. The public may bring picnic lunches or cold drinks other than alcohol. No alcohol is allowed on library property. The library’s Bookmark Café will have cold beverages, specialty drinks and snacks available up until 8:30 p.m.
If rain occurs and persists to cause cancellation of the performance, the rain date for the performance is Monday, August 6, at 6:30 p.m. 
In addition to the library’s parking lot, parking is also available in the public parking lots next to The Daily Times building (across the pedestrian bridge) and in the Harper Street parking lot across from First Tennessee Bank. This performance is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. 
Free and open to the public, the program is at the Blount County Public Library, located at 508 N. Cusick Street, Maryville.
For further information about library programs or services, call the library at 982-0981 or visit the Web site at www.blountlibrary.org . To
sign up to receive a monthly calendar by email, go to the library’s Home Page, click on the “News and Events” tab, and then  Calendar of Events

Title VI and Hispanics today


 Hispanic students represent 21 percent of the enrollment in high school but only 13 percent of students passed at least one Advanced Placement exam.
“We need to make sure our hispanic descent students are presented with the resources and the options all children in the school system are presented for their success”, said Maria Palatino, mother of two teenagers. 
 
 This week America is celebrating the 48th anniversary of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
 
Title VI states, ”No person in the United States shall, on the basis of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.” Title VI applies to all levels of educational institutions – public or private – that receive federal financial assistance.  The statute extends to all programs and activities and prohibits denial of equal access to college- and career-preparatory courses, programs for English learners, and discriminatory discipline and harassment—all of which are fundamental barriers to equal education.

Valid photo ID is needed to vote in November


In Tennessee, in addition to being a registered voter, you will need a valid photo ID.

Acceptable Photo IDs for Voting: Any of the following IDs may be used, even if expired:

  • Tennessee drivers license with your photo
  • United States Passport
  • Photo ID issued by the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security
  • Photo ID issued by the federal or ANY state government
  • United States Military photo ID
  • State-issued handgun carry permit with your photo

 

 

Photo IDs NOT Accepted for Voting:

  • College student IDs
  • Photo IDs not issued by the federal or a state government are NOT acceptable. 

Joven atropellada falleció en hospital


Nashville–Una joven mujer ha muerto como resultado de haber sido atropellada por un carro en Old Hickory Boulevard, Brentwood ayer por la noche.

Ricki Uselton Dawn, de 22 años, de Spring Hill, Tennessee fue atropellada alrededor de las 9:15 pm por Shawndra Moore, 26 años, de Joelton quien conducía un ’99 Pontiac Grand Prix.

Los investigadores dijeron que parece que Uselton, quien conducía su Volkswagen Jetta 2007, salió caminando en la Old Hickory Boulevard a la entrada de los apartamentos Brentwood Chase. Bo se conoce la razón por la que ella estaba caminando en la calle.

Uselton falleció el martes en Vanderbilt University Medical Center. No se han levantado cargos en contra de Moore.

Lego Creations Exhibited at the Blount County Public Library


MARYVILLE, TN  (July 12, 2012)   Build a fantastic creation with Lego blocks and enter a contest at the Blount County Public Library.  The exhibits will be on display for a week.

            Contestants will provide their own Lego pieces to build their entry.  Dimensions for the exhibits are no larger than 20” wide x 20” deep x 20” tall.  The pieces can be transported more easily on a sturdy board that can be set atop the magazine display shelves.

            There will be three categories of judging:  1) Child–age 12 and under;  2) Young Adult/Teen–age 13-19 years;  3) Adult–age 20+.

Contest entries should be delivered to the Blount County Public Library by 5 p.m. on Friday, July 27.  The entries will be judged and winners will be announced at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 28.

Entries will be displayed for one week.  Contestants may pick up their Legos on Saturday, August 4 before 5 p.m.

Entry forms and contest guidelines may be picked up at the Children’s Library desk of the library.

Free and open to the public, the program is at the Blount County Public Library, located at 508 N. Cusick Street, Maryville.

               For further information about library programs or services, call the library at 982-0981 or visit the Web site at www.blountlibrary.org .  To sign up to receive a monthly calendar by email, go to the library’s Home Page, click on the “News and Events” tab, and then “Calendar of Events Signup” and type in your email address.  Also check out Facebook at “Blount County Public Library” and Twitter at “Blount_Library”.

“EAT4-HEALTH” tackle Obesity among Youth in 10 States


Tennessee is among 10 states receiving a portion of a $300,000 grant from UnitedHealthcare as part of a new partnership between National 4-H Council and UnitedHealthcare.

The UnitedHealthcare 4-H Eat4-Health campaign will officially launch during the Tennessee 4-H All-Star Conference at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville Hollingsworth Auditorium, 2431 Joe Johnson Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996, where more than 400 4-H youth leaders will join together in a discussion about the importance of healthy living and how they can help lead the fight against obesity.

 UnitedHealthcare’s mascot Dr. Health E. Hound will be on hand to make a check presentation to national 4-H leaders and approximately 400 youth.  Dr. Health E. Hound will also lead the 400 youth in a fun, energetic group exercise to symbolize the beginning of the Eat4-Health campaign. Community leaders will also be on hand to lend their support for the program.

 The UnitedHealthcare 4-H Eat4-Health campaign will promote healthy living by empowering youth to help tackle the nation’s obesity epidemic. The partnership begins this summer and will activate thousands of 4-H youth ambassadors to make healthy choices for themselves and encourage friends, families and people in their communities to make positive changes through training, creative programs and educational events.

Community College Consortium targets federal funds


KNOXVILLE, Tenn.— More than 30 community colleges within the five-state Tennessee Valley Science and Technology Corridor region have formed an alliance to work more closely together.

 An idea of Lou Rabinowitz, director of workforce and economic development at Roane State Community College in Harriman, Tenn., the alliance is intended to help the colleges better compete for national grants, share curriculum and work together to address regional workforce, economic development and technology initiatives.  Rabinowitz reported that representatives from several of the colleges met at the annual Tennessee Valley Corridor (TVC) National Summit held last May in Somerset, Kentucky to officially organize and launch the new TVC Community College Consortium.

 Dr. Gary Goff, president of Roane State, says the schools will work together to:

  •  Support emerging technologies, workforce development opportunities, and economic development initiatives, particularly in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics;
  • Collaborate in submitting national grant proposals; and
  • Establish plans to share curricula and resources among the institutions.

 “By working together we can win more grants, develop better workforce programs and serve more effectively the businesses and communities we represent,” said Rabinowitz.  “And by working with the TVC, we can harness and build upon the existing spirit of unity within the five-state region.”

 Colleges represented at the Somerset meeting were: from Tennessee — Roane State Community College (Harriman), Chattanooga State Community College, Motlow State Community College (Tullahoma), Northeast State Community College (Tri-Cities) and Pellissippi State Community College (Knoxville); from Alabama — Calhoun Community College (Limestone); from Kentucky — Somerset Community College and Ashland Community and Technical College; and from Virginia — Mountain Empire Community College (Big Stone Gap).  The Tennessee Board of Regents and several regional business leaders also participated in the Somerset meeting.  

 Institutional membership in the consortium is limited to publicly funded community colleges within the ten Congressional Districts that define the Tennessee Valley Corridor. Additional plans and progress reports will be shared by the TVC Community College Consortium at an upcoming Corridor event, which is being planned for December 9-10, in Kingsport, Tennessee. 

 For more information or to become a partner in the TVC Community College Consortium, please contact Lou Rabinowitz at Roane State Community College at (865) 481.2037 or rabinowitzlo@roanestate.edu.

EarthLink Completes Morristown Network of Eastern Tennessee Middle Mile Fiber Broadband Project


MORRISTOWN, TN —  EarthLink, Inc. (NASDAQ: ELNK), a leading IT services and communications provider, announced completion of the Morristown, TN network interconnection point as part of the third and final phase of its Eastern Tennessee Middle Mile Fiber Broadband Project. Four additional broadband network interconnection points will be completed by March 2012 in the Cookeville, Oak Ridge, Cleveland, and Sweetwater communities. These areas have been designated as ‘underserved’ by Connected Tennessee, an independent non-profit organization that develops and implements effective strategies for technology deployment, use and literacy in Tennessee.

 

With this new network in place, EarthLink BusinessTM will begin actively offering its full suite of IT and communications services to Morristown businesses and organizations via its Knoxville sales office.

 

“With the completion of the Morristown network, EarthLink Business can offer businesses and institutions in the area with a new choice for improved connectivity,” said Jim O’Brien, EarthLink Executive Vice President of Network Services and Customer Operations. “In a traditionally underserved region, providing the means for more effective technology deployment will help enable institutions of all sizes and industries to grow and expand, powered by enhanced broadband access that better meets the needs of their customers and constituencies.”

 

EarthLink’s Tennessee broadband project was funded by $9.4 million in federal stimulus funding by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) through the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program (BTOP). It comprises a fiber optic network of more than 500 miles in Eastern Tennessee and provides middle mile broadband services to carrier customers, core community anchor institutions including education and healthcare providers, and last mile service providers in speeds up to 10Gbps.

 

The Phase Two network expansion, completed in June of this year, included deployment of a new 131-mile fiber optic route from Knoxville, Tennessee to Bristol, Tennessee. Point of Presence (POP) sites along the route include: Knoxville, TN; Morristown, TN; Johnson City, TN; and Bristol, TN. Phase I completion, announced in March, included a 343-mile overbuild of an existing diverse fiber optic route from Nashville to Knoxville, and the addition of a new diverse fiber optic route from Knoxville to Chattanooga.

 

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Departamento del Trabajo proteje al trabajador


 La División de Horas y Salarios del Departamento del Trabajo de Estados Unidos dirige una iniciativa de cumplimiento de la ley en Mississippi, para proteger los derechos de los  trabajadores agrícolas y educar a los patrones iniciativa también se orienta a las desmotadoras de algodón y las operaciones de apoyo durante la cosecha anual

 

JACKSON, Mississippi. — La División de Horas y Salarios del Departamento del Trabajo de EE. UU. se encuentra realizando una iniciativa de cumplimiento de la ley enfocada en la industria agrícola de Mississippi y sus operaciones relacionadas, como desmotadoras de algodón, donde la división antes había encontrado infracciones generalizadas a las leyes laborales. El objetivo de esta iniciativa, que durará varios años, es aumentar los niveles de cumplimiento de la ley por parte de los patrones y recordar a los trabajadores sus derechos según la Ley de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas Eventuales y Migrantes, la Ley de Prácticas Justas en el Trabajo y el programa de trabajadores temporales no migrantes H-2A.  

 

El incumplimiento significativo y persistente ha afectado a muchos trabajadores vulnerables, incluyendo a los jornaleros migrantes o eventuales, que perciben salarios muy bajos y cuyo dominio del idioma inglés es muy limitado. Desde 2008, la Oficina de Distrito de la Costa del Golfo, con sede en Birmingham, Alabama, ha realizado casi 150 investigaciones de operaciones agrícolas y de apoyo en su jurisdicción, que abarca a Mississippi, y recuperó $271,332 dólares en salarios adeudados a 571 empleados.

 

Con base en los descubrimientos de estas investigaciones, a la división le preocupa particularmente la gravedad de la falta de cumplimiento de las leyes por parte de la industria desmotadora de algodón de Mississippi. Los investigadores descubrieron que muchos empleados trabajaban turnos muy largos, con frecuencia de 12 o más horas al día, hasta siete días a la semana, durante la temporada de desmote del algodón en otoño; sin recibir la compensación apropiada por el tiempo extra, como lo exige la Ley de de Prácticas Justas en el Trabajo. Otras violaciones comunes encontradas incluían el no informar a los trabajadores de sus derechos bajo la ley, no mantener registros precisos de salarios y horas trabajadas, no pagar tiempo extra a trabajadores no agrícolas, no entregar las declaraciones de salarios o no pagar éstos en las fechas indicadas, no publicar las condiciones de vivienda en las unidades habitacionales para migrantes proporcionadas por el patrón, y no cerciorarse que las instalaciones cumplieran con las normas federales de salud y seguridad en la vivienda que exige la Ley de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas Eventuales y Migrantes.    

 

“El objetivo de estas acciones de cumplimiento de la ley es proteger a los trabajadores agrícolas y a los que trabajan en industrias relacionadas, a quienes con frecuencia se les niega la retribución que les garantizan la Ley de Prácticas Justas en el Trabajo y otras leyes laborales federales”, dijo Ken Stripling, director de la oficina de la división de la Costa del Golfo, que también supervisa la Oficina de Distrito de Jackson en Mississippi.  “Estas investigaciones también ayudan a asegurar condiciones justas de trabajo y proteger los intereses de los patrones que cumplen con la ley, que acatan las reglas y que pagan salarios justos”.

 

Con base en esta iniciativa, los equipos de investigadores de la División de Sueldos y Salarios evalúan el cumplimiento entre los propietarios de instalaciones, contratistas de mano de obra agrícola y todas las demás entidades de negocios que proporcionan apoyo a estas operaciones agrícolas en todo el estado de Mississippi. Se llevan a cabo inspecciones minuciosas de las unidades de vivienda de los trabajadores migrantes, los vehículos de transporte, las prácticas de empleo y los registros de salarios, a fin de garantizar que se cumpla con todas las normas laborales agrícolas aplicables. Cuando se descubren violaciones, la división emprenderá acciones correctivas, incluyendo el litigio, sanciones pecuniarias y embargos de bienes calientes o hot goods, para recuperar los salarios de los trabajadores y procurar que se responda ante la ley.

 

Además, la división busca acercarse a los trabajadores agrícolas, para informarles de sus derechos y, para hacerlo colabora con los grupos comunitarios, agencias estatales, organizaciones patronales y funcionarios locales. Asimismo, la división está comprometida en brindar asistencia y educación en el cumplimiento a los patrones y a las asociaciones industriales, como Delta Council y Southern Cotton Ginning Association, acerca de todas las normas laborales agrícolas aplicables, restricciones al trabajo infantil, requerimientos regulatorios H-2A y responsabilidades conjuntas de los patrones. En julio, los investigadores participaron en la reunión anual de Delta Council y presentaron la información y materiales de cumplimiento a los miembros de la misma.

 

La mayoría de los patrones que participan en la agricultura están sujetos a las leyes federales, porque producen bienes para el comercio interestatal. Además, los patrones agrícolas no exentos, las asociaciones agrícolas y los contratistas de mano de obra agrícola están sujetos a la Ley de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas Eventuales y Migrantes, que protege a los trabajadores migrantes y eventuales al establecer normas de trabajo relativas a salarios, vivienda, transporte, revelación de información y manejo de los libros contables. Asimismo, la Ley de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas Eventuales y Migrantes exige que los contratistas de mano de obra agrícola se registren en el Departamento del Trabajo.

 

La Ley de Prácticas Justas en el Trabajo establece normas para el salario mínimo, pago de tiempo extra y limitaciones en el trabajo infantil. Exige que se pague a los empleados cubiertos y no exentos el salario mínimo federal de $7.25 dólares por hora, por todas las horas trabajadas. Los trabajadores cubiertos y no exentos que se emplean en ocupaciones no agrícolas deben percibir una vez y media sus niveles normales de retribución, incluyendo comisiones, bonos y pago de incentivos, por las horas que trabajen más de 40 a la semana. Asimismo, se exige a los patrones llevar registros precisos de todas las horas trabajadas por los empleados cubiertos. Los trabajadores menores de 18 años de edad no pueden trabajar en ninguna ocupación no agrícola que el Departamento del Trabajo haya declarado peligrosa. Estas tareas peligrosas se identifican por 17 órdenes de ocupación peligrosa.

 

Además, cada vez que los bienes se produzcan violando las estipulaciones de salario mínimo, tiempo extra o trabajo infantil de la Ley de Prácticas Justas en el Trabajo, el Departamento del Trabajo puede aplicar la provisión de “bienes calientes” para impedir que dichos bienes se embarquen como comercio interestatal.

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Classifieds-Public Notice


KTA holds public hearing on proposed elimination of express route

The Knoxville Transportation Authority will hold a public hearing on Thursday, July 26, 2012 to hear comments on the proposed elimination of KAT’s Route 101X – The Cedar Bluff Express.  The route has suffered from low ridership for the past twenty-four months, consistently in the lowest performance quartile, but more recently, KAT was informed that the route would no longer be able to use the current Park & Ride location on Executive Park Drive, effective September 30, 2012.

 

“While we don’t want to see any of our services go away, we have to be realistic about the track record of this particular route, as well as the challenges associated with offering park & ride services,” says Cindy McGinnis, KAT General Manager.  “Finding a park & ride lot is the most challenging part of providing express route services, and while we have worked on identifying a new location, we have not found anything that will work.”

 

KAT does not purchase or lease locations for park & ride facilities due to budget constraints, so park & ride lots must be provided through an agreement with a private property owner, or, in the case of the Farragut Express, by the Town of Farragut. 

 

If approved for elimination, the route will end effective September 30, 2012.  Current 101X passengers are encouraged to use the 102X – Farragut Express or the Route 11 – Kingston Pike bus.

 

The public is encouraged to comment on the proposal.  Comments can be made by attending the meeting, scheduled for Thursday, July 26, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. in the Main Assembly Room of the City County Building, 400 Main Street.  Comments can also be made to KAT by calling  865-637-3000 or by visitingkatbus.com and clicking on the “Contact us” link.

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2012 Foothills Fall Festival artist lineup.


Maryville, Tenn. – After months of anticipation, the City of Maryville is proud to announce the highly anticipated 2012 Foothills Fall Festival artist lineup.

Music superstars Train, Darius Rucker, Gary Allan and Thompson Square will perform for thousands of fans at the 12th Annual Foothills Fall Festival taking place Oct. 12-14 at Maryville’s Theater in the Park.

Gary Allan kicks off the weekend on Friday, Oct. 12. The California-born country star just released his eighth album, “Get Off on the Pain” and is best known for his soulful and rocked-out country sound.

Grammy award-winning pop band Train will take the stage on Saturday, Oct. 13 along with Lauren Alaina and Bridgette Tatum. Alaina was the first runner-up on American Idol’s tenth season last year, falling just short of winner Scotty McCreery. Train hit mainstream success in 1998 with their hit single “Meet Virginia.” Other hits include “Drops of Jupiter,” “Hey, Soul Sister,” and “Calling All Angels.” Their newest hit is “Drive By” off their latest album California 37.

The festival weekend wraps up on Sunday, Oct. 14 with Darius Rucker, Thompson Square, Brad Blackwell and The Farm.

Darius Rucker is riding high with the release of his sophomore country album, Charleston, SC 1966. Rucker’s success in country music has been recognized with awards from the Country Music Association, Academy of Country Music, Teen Choice Awards and several American Music Awards nominations.

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Teen Masquerade Ball to be at the Blount County Public Library


MARYVILLE, TN  (July 16, 2012)   Teens, plan now to participate in the Realms of Darkness Masquerade Ball at the Blount County Public Library.  Whether you’re a novice or an expert dancer, don’t worry because JW Becker, with Champion Ballroom of Knoxville, will be leading a ballroom dance class.

            The Masquerade Ball, the grand finale for this year’s summer reading program, “Own the Night,” will be on Saturday, July 21, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the library.

            Teens can dress like a favorite book character—preferably of a spooky variety—or just in fancy, fun dance clothes!

            In addition, teens will be able to make masks for the masquerade ball, of course!  Free food will be available.  And there will be announcements of winners of various contests from the teen summer reading program.

                With more than eight years’ experience, JW Becker has learned how to help people new to dance to enjoy what they learn and make the journey into the world of dance a fulfilling one. JW has also been part of Knoxville’s own Dancing With The Stars this year with Missy Kane, a benefit for East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, and is glad to share his abilities for such a good cause.

            Champion Ballroom Center is committed to bringing the excitement and joy of dance to everyone.

Free and open to the public, the program is at the Blount County Public Library, located at 508 N. Cusick Street, Maryville.

               For further information about library programs or services, call the library at 982-0981 or visit the Web site atwww.blountlibrary.org .  To sign up to receive a monthly calendar by email, go to the library’s Home Page, click on the “News and Events” tab, and then “Calendar of Events Signup” and type in your email address.  Also check out Facebook at “Blount County Public Library” and Twitter at “Blount_Library”

2012 World’s Longest Yardsale Set For August 2nd – 5th


 

The 25th Annual “World’s Longest Yardsale” Now 690 Miiles!

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the sale, now stretching from 5 miles north of Addison, Michigan all the way down to Gadsden, Alabama!

The US 127 Corridor Sale started in 1987. It now runs from 5 miles north of Addison, MI, south to Chattanooga, TN, then switches to the Lookout Mountain Parkway, continuing to Gadsden, AL for a total of 690 miles!.

The Fentress County Chamber of Commerce in Jamestown, Tennessee has served as headquarters for the 127 Corridor Sale since 1995. We are centrally located along the route. Fentress County can also claim the origin of the sale. Mike Walker, the County Executive in 1987, came up with the idea of the sale, worked hard to make it happen, and planned for it to be an annual event.

The four day sale always starts on the first Thursday in August making dates for the 25th annual sale to be August 2-5, 2012. The sale is very popular, and visitors from several foreign countries have attended.

The original intent of the sale was to prove the back roads have something to offer, and that the interstate system was not the only mode for travel. County officials put together a list of attractions along the route in Kentucky and Tennessee. There are over three hundred attractions along the route to provide enjoyment for the family. Whether it be majestic hills, beautiful scenery, river boats, railroads, toe tapping music, arts, crafts, horses, fishing, hiking, bits of Civil War or Indian History, there are many opportunities to enjoy the beauty and culture of the land along the 127 Sale Route.

The Lookout Mountain Parkway Association asked to be included in the sale route a few years after the sale began. The Lookout Mountain Parkway leaves Chattanooga as Highway 58 and becomes several different highway numbers before reaching Gadsden. It is no longer US 127, but is the same great sale. This routing crosses the Northwest corner of Georgia, going into Cloudland. This added another 100 miles to the already existing 350 miles, thus making it 450 miles — “The World’s Longest Yard Sale”.

Thousands of people participate in the sale each year as vendors. A front lawn may be turned into a showcase as items are displayed. Off road parking is essential, and many of the homes have this space. Visitors should honor requests of “No Parking” or “No Trespassing” posted by families not participating in the sale–cars can leave deep tire ruts on a soft lawn.

As the sale developed, a vacant field, at a good location has proven to be an excellent place to rent as vendor space. This yields a cluster of sellers at one spot and reduces the stop and park routine of the buyers. Such areas can be spotted from a distance because of the activity. Community parks, such at the South Fentress Park, are proving to be ideal for a grouping of vendors, as good parking and restrooms are available.

People come from near and far to view this spectacular event. Folks come from all across the country by car, truck, motor home or plane. Some fly in, rent a car, travel the route and ship the newfound treasures back home. Some pull a trailer behind a truck, park the trailer somewhere and run around in the truck seeking items. Pulling a trailer will often limit the places you can visit. A large vehicle may prove to be a problem on this two-lane highway. Traffic congestion is part of the annual phenomenon to be endured, but the chance of finding a treasure lures them on. Many visitors plan their vacations around the sale event, with some traveling the entire 450 miles. Others may opt to spend their time in a selected area, and venture off the beaten path to discover the history and charm of the land.

Whatever the mode of travel you may choose, please do expect plenty of traffic. The pace may slow to that of snarled rush hour traffic. It may be bumper to bumper with everyone stretching their neck to see what is on a seller’s table or in the front lawn. Do expect sudden stops to occur without warning, and drive carefully and defensively. Enjoy the spot wherever you are, because down the road a few miles may be a space where no vendors are set up and the traffic will move along as usual. You are here to enjoy the sale and most of the other vehicles are too.

Some book motel rooms a year in advance. A few weeks prior to the sale date, most of the motel rooms are taken. Bed and Breakfast type lodgings do a brisk business during this sale, with most any type of overnight lodging being filled each night. Southern hospitality has lead to couples being taken into private homes because nothing else was available. Some visitors to the sale try to find lodging when and where needed. Some find cancellations, some go up to fifty miles, to the right or left of the sale route, to spend the night. Some even sleep in their car. However, these are considered small inconveniences in light of the excitement of finding the deal of the day & anticipation of a big shopping spree.

A few dislike the snarled traffic associated with the sale, but all must admit, the sale is good for the economy along the corridor route. Locals sell their crafts, accommodations are filled, restaurants are crowded, and those renting vendor spaces also add to the local economy. Those who want to break away from the sale may want to visit the local attractions.

For more information regarding the annual Hwy 127 Corridor Sale are encouraged to visit our website at www.127sale.com . Brochures can be obtained by calling 1-800-327-3945, however, there is more information on the website than we are able to put in the brochures.

 

 

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Schools in Nashville ready to start 2012-2013


August 1 is the first day of school for 2012-2013. Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools serve nearly 79,000 students with the goal of being the first choice for families in Nashville and Davidson County. The governing body for MNPS is the Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County Board of Public Education, a nine-member group elected by residents of Metropolitan Nashville. For more information, please visit www.mnps.org.

 

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HUD AND OWNER, MANAGER OF ALABAMA APARTMENT COMPLEX SETTLE ALLEGATIONS OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST PROSPECTIVE HISPANIC TENANTS


WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced today that it has reached an agreement with Chilton Associates, Ltd., owner of Peachtree Apartments in Clanton, Alabama, and its manager Sunbelt Management Company, settling allegations that they maintained a policy of discriminating against prospective tenants based on national origin. Specifically, HUD alleged that Peachtree Apartments required that prospective Hispanic tenants provide documentation of their immigration status, while not asking the same of non-Hispanic individuals.

The Fair Housing Act makes it unlawful to impose different rental terms and conditions based on national origin, race, color, religion, sex, familial status, or disability.

“Where you come from does not dictate where you can live,” said John Trasviña, HUD Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. “Every person has the right to housing free from discrimination based on ethnicity. We are pleased that this company has taken steps to comply with the Fair Housing Act.”

The settlement stems from a complaint initiated by HUD after the Central Alabama Fair Housing Center (CAFHC) informed HUD that fair housing tests it had conducted suggested discrimination at the property. In one test, the property manager of Peachtree Apartments allegedly asked a CAFHC tester who was posing as a prospective tenant whether she was Hispanic. When the tester replied that she was Hispanic, the manager allegedly required that the tester produce a green card or “work visa.” The manager also allegedly required the same identification from the prospective tenant’s mother and two sons.

Under the settlement agreement, Chilton Associates will adopt non-discriminatory admission policies, develop a plan to market housing opportunities to populations with limited English proficiency in its service areas and provide translation services, and administer fair housing training to its employees and contractors. These provisions will apply to 9,406 housing units at 264 properties in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Chilton Associates will also donate $5,000 to CAFHC to support fair housing enforcement and education, donate $5,000 to a local Alabama non-profit organization that serves the Latino community, and conduct periodic testing to ensure that it is providing its services to every applicant equally, regardless of national origin.



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TPR FEDERAL-MOGUL TENNESSEE, INC. TO ESTABLISH OPERATIONS IN LAWRENCEBURG


Automotive Original Parts Manufacturer to Create 72 Jobs, Invest $31 Million in Lawrence County

 

NASHVILLE Tennessee Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bill Hagerty joined with company officials today to announce TPR Federal-Mogul Tennessee, Inc. will locate a manufacturing plant in Lawrence County. The Lawrenceburg facility, located at 201 Helton Drive, will serve the North American automobile manufacturing industry and create 72 jobs.

“We are excited to welcome TPR and Federal-Mogul to Tennessee, and I thank the companies for the investment they are making in Lawrence County and the jobs they are creating,” Hagerty said.  “With Gov. Haslam’s leadership and business background, Tennessee’s reputation as a business-friendly state continues to strengthen. I am pleased companies like TPR continue to invest and grow here.”

 TPR Federal-Mogul Tennessee is the third joint venture between TPR Co. LTD and the Federal-Mogul Corporation in the United States. The group also has operations in Minnesota and Wisconsin. The facility will produce cylinder liners for aluminum block engines and will house foundry, machining and warehousing functions. The facility is projected to begin operations in May of 2013. 

 “TPR is excited about the opportunity to grow its business and invest in Tennessee. We were attracted to the area due to the business friendly climate, skilled workforce, and proximity to our customers and suppliers. We have been impressed by the efforts of officials at the state, county, and city level. Their coordination and hard work were a major factor in our decision to choose this location,” TPR America said.

 TPR America, Inc., the wholly owned subsidiary of TPR Co. LTD and controlling shareholder of the joint venture, is based in Schaumburg, Illinois and oversees North American operations. TPR manufactures a number of powertrain products for the automotive industry.  Major parts include piston rings, cylinder liners, valve seats, and a number of aluminum, alloy, and resin products.

 Federal-Mogul Corporation (NASDAQ:FDML) designs, engineers, manufactures and distributes technologies to improve fuel economy, reduce emissions and enhance vehicle safety. The company serves as the world’s foremost original equipment manufacturers of automotive, commercial, transport and industrial equipment, and the worldwide automotive aftermarket.

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Tennessee Tragedies at East Tennessee History Center


The new book Tennessee Tragedies by Allen R. Coggins is the first compilation of historical disasters for any state.  The comprehensive work ranges widely from floods, earthquakes, heat waves, and tornadoes to mining accidents, fire, labor strikes, transportation crashes, epidemics, Ku Klux Klan violence, race riots, and everything in-between. 

The lecture by Coggins on July 11 will include a historical overview of the subject and a closer look at some of the more compelling stories, as well as our response to human tragedy.  Coggins is a former emergency management specialist and is currently a subcontractor with the Environment, Safety, and Health Office of Oak Ridge Associate Universities.  Author Coggins recently received an “Award of Research Excellence” from the East Tennessee Historical Society.

 The program is sponsored by 21st Mortgage Corp, and is free and open to the public. 

The lecture will begin at noon at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville.  Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture.  Soft drinks will be available.  For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.  

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